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Until now I figured out one thing: numismatics and avid coin lovers have their most reliable partners in governments worldwide. Why am I saying this? Well, I am sure you noticed how for example, an English Royal Mint mints new coins every year in honor of the Queen and the Royal Family. The same goes for the U.S Government.

Every year shortly before President’s Day the government mints new and valuable Presidental $1 Coins which become very sought-after. However, this wasn’t the tradition back in the day, this in fact is a new custom that dated from 2007 until 2016.

Anyhow, this does not diminish their rarity and value so I think the best thing we can do is to explore all of them and see which Presidental dollar coin is the most valuable one.

What Is The Presidental Coin Program And Why Is It Important?

The Presidential Coin Program was created for the simple purpose of honoring all the deceased presidents that served in the White House. It was signed into law in December 2005 by former President George W. Bush. Also, the First Spouses were honored under this program with uncirculated mints.

The very first coin with the image of the first president, George Washington was minted in January 2007. The program laid out two ground rules and guidelines for issuing these one-dollar coins:

  • The list must follow the exact line in the order that each president served in the White House.
  • The former president must be deceased for at least two years before it gets its own presidential coin.

The program ended in 2016 with the Reagan mint. The only reason was that the popularity of these coins rapidly declined and the stockpiles in Federal Reserve vaults were approximately $1.4 billion of Presidential dollar coins.

The former Secretary of the Treasure declared in 2011 that the U.S. Mint stop minting and circulating the presidential coins. This way the taxpayers saved up to $50 million per year. So from 2012 to the end of the program, only a small number of new coins were minted only for coin collectors.

Why are Presidential $1 Coins valuable?

Like with all coins not all of them are valuable. As I said there are over a billion Presidential coins in Federal Reserves so not all of them are valuable and rare. However, there were some minting errors in the early stages (the first few months).

These errors include things like missing mint marks, issuance year, or edge inscriptions for “In God We Trust” and “E Pluribus Unum”. Of course, these aren’t the only errors, some coins feature upside-down words on the rim. Some people also found coins that were missing entire portraits, on one or both sides.

So to conclude presidential coins may be valuable due to minting errors or rarity. The Woodrow Wilson coin has the fewest number in circulation with only 7,980,000 coins.

Which Presidential Coins Are The Most Valuable?

Due to the printing errors during the early mint phase in the 2007 series of coins, naturally, the first two series of George Washington and John Adams coins hold the highest possible values for Presidential $1 Coins.

However, don’t despair there are many other Presidental $1 Coins that hold a special value as well. Here is the final list.

Name Mintage Metal composition Diameter and weight Varieties Year Estimated value for uncirculated coins
(2007) George Washington Presidential Dollar — Double Denomination on a Jefferson Nickel — MS64 PCGS 176,680,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese 2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $17,625
(2007) $1 Madison Presidential Dollar — Double Struck on an Aluminum Finger Feeder Tip — MS66 PCGS 84,560,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $8,050
George Washington 2007-P. Edge Error. Double Edge Lettering – Overlap PCGS graded MS-64 176,680,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $6,000 still unsold
Thomas Jefferson 2007-P. Edge Error. Double Edge Lettering Overlap

PCGS graded MS-65

100,800,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 Estimated value between $7,500 and $10,000 but sold for

$4,313

Zachary Taylor 2009-P. Edge Error. Double Edge Lettering – Overlap Position B. PCGS graded MS-65 41,580,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2009 Estimated value between $7,500 and $10,000 but sold for

$4,313

John Tyler2009-P.  Edge Error. Double Edge Lettering. Overlap Position B. PCGS graded MS-66 43,540,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
26.5 mm

8.1 grams

Yes 2009 Estimated value between $7,500 and $10,000 but sold for

$4,313

Millard Fillmore 2010-P. Edge Error. Weak Edge Lettering Position B. PCGS graded MS-64 37,520,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2010 Estimated value between $7,500 and $10,000 but sold for

$4,313

James K. Polk 2009-P. Edge Error. Partial Edge Lettering  Position A. PCGS graded MS-64 46,620,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2009 Estimated value between $7,500 and $10,000 but sold for

$4,313

(2007) $1 Presidential Dollar John Adams D/S on 9grs Aluminum FF MS64 PCGS 112,420,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $3,335
(2007) Presidential Dollar. Thomas Jefferson Struck 30% Off Center–MS-66 (NGC) 100,800,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $2,937
George Washington 2007-D. Edge Error. Partial Edge Lettering Position B. PCGS graded MS-64 163,680,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 Estimated value between $5,000 and $6,000 but sold for

$2,875

Ulysses S. Grant 2011-P. Edge Error. Partial Edge Lettering Position A. PCGS graded MS-65 38,080,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2011 Estimated value between $5,000 and $6,000 but sold for

$2,875

 

2007 $1 Madison, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish MS66 PCGS 87,780,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $2,530
(2007) John Adams Presidential Dollar–Struck Twice on an Aluminum Feeder Finger Fragment–MS64 PCGS 112,140,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $2,300
2015-P $1 John F. Kennedy, Reverse Proof, Chronicles Set, PR70 NGC 49,226
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams

 

Yes 2015 $2,160
(2009) Harrison, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish MS69 NGC 43,260,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams

 

Yes 2009 $1,955
2007 $1 John Adams Presidential Dollar — Missing Edge Lettering, Double Struck 112,420,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams

 

Yes 2007 $1,860
(2008) Van Buren, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish MS68 NGC 51,520,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2008 $1,840
2007 $1 Thomas Jefferson–Missing Edge Lettering–MS66 PCGS 100,800,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $1,725
(2007) $1 Jefferson Missing Edge Lettering MS66 PCGS 100,800,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $1,552
(2009) $1 James Polk, Missing Edge Lettering MS65 NGC 46,620,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2009 $1,495
(2008) $1 Jackson Presidential Dollar–Die Adjustment Strike, Missing Edge Lettering

MS64 PCGS

 

61,180,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2008 $1,380
(2007) John Adams Presidential Dollar — Multiple Strikes, 33% Double Clip, Missing Edge Lettering — MS63 PCGS 112,420,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $1,320
(2009) $1 William Henry Harrison, Satin Finish–Missing Edge Lettering–MS68 SMS NGC 43,260,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel

 

  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2009 $1,265
2009-D $1 Polk Presidential Dollar–Die Adjustment Strike–NGC 41,720,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2009 $1,265
(2008) $1 Martin Van Buren, Satin Finish–Missing Edge Lettering–MS67 SMS NGC 51,520,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2008 $1,265
(2009) $1 John Tyler, Satin Finish–Missing Edge Lettering–MS67 NGC 43,540,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2009 $1,150
2015-P $1 Harry S. Truman, First Strike, Reverse Proof, PR70 PCGS. 16,812
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2015 $1,145
(2007) $1 Plain Edge, John Adams Presidential Dollar — Double Struck, Second Strike 10% Off Center — MS64 PCGS 112,420,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2007 $1,080
2008-P $1 James Monroe Position B, First Day Of Issue, MS68 PCGS 64,260,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2008 $822
(2008) $1 John Quincy Adams SMS Dollar Missing Edge Lettering MS66 NGC 57,540,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams
Yes 2008 $747
(2009) William Harrison Dollar, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish MS67 SMS NGC 43,260,000
  • 88.5% copper
  • 6% zinc
  • 3.5% manganese  2% nickel
  • 26.5 mm
  • 8.1 grams

 

Yes 2009 $632

How To Recognize A Real Presidential $1 Coin?

The main point of the Presidential coin program was to redesign the $1 appearance to be prettier and at the same time to provide honor to all the former presidents. With this, they would at the same time spark the forgotten interest in coins as valuable collectibles.

The Presidential $1 Coins are significantly different from other $1 coins. Here is what you should look for:

  • They have a composition that is very similar to the Sacagawea Dollar and Native American Dollar;
  • An engraving of the president’s portrait on the front is larger and more dramatic;
  • The Statue of Liberty is always printed on the back;
  • It must have the year of minting, the mint mark, and the thirteen stars;
  • Also the edge inscriptions of the motto In God We Trust, and the E Pluribus Unum, is engraved on the edge of the coin. However, the 2009 coins have In God We Trust engraved on the obverse.

Where Should I Look For Presidential $1 Coins?

Well since these coins were minted in large quantities and used in everyday life, the first stop where you should look for the rare and valuable presidential coins are your pockets and your wallet. Make sure you take a good look after you get your change back, maybe you are that lucky to come across some insanely valuable $1 coin.

As usual, if you don’t have time to wait, you can always hit the Internet or the local numismatic store and check what they have to offer. However, make sure you purchase collectible coins from reliable sources only. Here is the list of the best places where you should look for collectible coins:

You can also try your luck on the coin shows and auctions in person or live on the Internet. Visit websites like Live Auctioneers, eBay, and Etsy but be careful there since no one can grant you that coins aren’t fake.

FAQ

How much are Presidential Dollar Coins worth?

This mainly depends on which of the billion of presidential coins you have. Some coins are estimated to be worth around a few thousand dollars, some even ten thousand dollars. While others vary from literally two dollars up to a few hundred dollars.

Also, uncirculated coins are those that get a better price. On the other hand, circulated coins are worth a face value or a bit more depending on the condition and rarity.

What are the most valuable Presidential Dollar Coins?

There are three error varieties of Presidential coins that are more valuable than the rest. These errors make them unique, if you think you may have such specimens take them to the professional for evaluation. Pay attention to these three coins:

  • 007 George Washington with error – missing edge lettering, the estimated value is from $7,000 to $10,000.
  • 2007 John Adams with error – .issing edge lettering.
  • 2007-P John Adams with error – double edge lettering.

Where were these coins minted?

To make sure your coins are real and not fake, check for the mint marking. Only three official mints were in charge of producing the coins. You will find the first letter of the City where the coin was minted. It is located on the edge of the coin. Look for the:

  • Denver Mint (D)
  • Philadelphia Mint (P)
  • San Francisco Mint (S)

This Is How You Know Your Presidential Dollar Coin Value

I hope this article will spark some interest in the Presidential coins. They are unjustifiably underrated. Yes, they might not be as valuable and pricey as some other coins on the market, but they can still be a great addition to the collection of every coin enthusiast.

In case you want to discuss in depth about this topic, I can advise you to visit the Coin Community forum where they have a special section for Presidential Dollar fans.

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