Dimes have always been the centre of attention among many underappreciated things in life.

Have you ever heard of the phrase “a dime a dozen”?

For those who haven’t, let me do the honours. The phrase— a dime a dozen— represents something of little value.

Then why go to the extent of calling it underappreciated?

I did this because today, we will discuss the most valuable dimes— particularly the Roosevelt Dimes.

Not every dime can be coloured with the suggestion of being worthless. Some of the Roosevelt Dimes are valuable enough to get you through college or buy you a beautiful house. But how exactly would one know which dime is worth more and which is not?

There have been thousands of such coins in circulation (or uncirculated) ever since 1946. Finding the right one can be tiring.

However, this article has rounded up the top 15 most valuable Roosevelt Dimes since 1946. But before we move on to our list, let’s have a background check on this dime.

Brief History of Roosevelt Dime

The Roosevelt Dime was first struck in 1946, and since then, the dime has seen two eras.

First, from the day it was struck to just before the Coinage Act of 1965. And second, from 1965 till to-date. After 1965, the dimes were minted in clad instead of silver. However, after 1992, special mint sets were created, composed of dimes with 90% Silver metals.

Let’s quickly look at the critical differences between the two compositions.

Roosevelt Dime – Compositions
Year Silver Composition (1946 – 1964) Clad Composition (1965 – To date)
Designer John R. Sinnock
Composition 90% Silver and 10% Copper 91.67% Copper and 8.33% Nickel
Mass 2.5 g 2.27 g
Diameter 17.9 mm 17.9
Melt Value $1.55 $1.41
Estimated Value $2 – $20 $2.81 – $7.88
Minted in San Francisco, Philadelphia, and Denver San Francisco, Philadelphia, West Point, and Denver
Source

In many cases, Roosevelt dimes have consistent and straightforward values – within $20. However, in some rare cases, the values can go up to more than half a million dollars.

Roosevelt Dime – The Most Valuable and Rare Dimes

1. 1975-S Roosevelt Dime No-S PR68

1975-S Roosevelt Dime No-S PR68

  • Price: $525,000+
  • Year: 1975
  • Mintage: 2,845,450
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $0207

Although you can easily find the ones with mint marks under $10.00, the 1975-S No S Dimes are extremely rare. Only two examples of the No S 1975 Roosevelt Dimes have surfaced until now. The first was unveiled in 1977, while another came only seven years later.

The dime does not show the “S” mint mark on the obverse. It was an error, which was handled promptly. However, few coins had already been struck till then. So the most sought-after Roosevelt Dime came into existence.

The coin was auctioned and sold in 2019 at a whopping price of $456,000.00

2. 1968 Roosevelt Dime No-S Cameo (Proof) PR68

1968 Roosevelt Dime No-S Cameo (Proof) PR68

  • Price: $48,875
  • Year: 1968
  • Mintage: NA
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $0207

The “No S” error has paved the way for some of the rarest and most valuable Roosevelt Dimes. The ones struck in 1968 are the second most valued.

The obverse can be seen without the mint mark of S– San Francisco. The dimes were initially struck off at Philadelphia, where the mint marks were not inscribed due to error.

While a handful of dimes were certified by PCGS, only three have been identified as PR68CAMs, which show a relatively crispier outlook on both sides.

3. 1968 Roosevelt Dime No-S (Proof) PR67

1968 Roosevelt Dime No-S (Proof) PR67 

  • Price: $40,250
  • Year: 1968
  • Mintage: 3,041,506
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $0207

1968 saw the first time Roosevelt Dimes were struck without an S mint mark. Since then, only a few of the 1968 No-S dimes have been certified by PCGS – 18, to be exact.

The dimes have gained much attention since their inception and more so recently. The dime saw a five-times increase in value in less than eight years. Almost all the samples are available in grades PR67 and PR68.

Out of the 18 certified by PCGS, only 12 are in Proof condition to be categorized under this heading.

4. 1951 Roosevelt Dime Deep Cameo (Proof) PR68

1951 Roosevelt Dime Deep Cameo (Proof) PR68

  • Price: $23,500
  • Year: 1951
  • Mintage: 57,500
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $4063

While the ones available in proof condition can be valued at $56, the Cameo and Deep Cameo can fetch $10,000+ easily.

Currently, only 1,700 Proofs have been certified by PCGS. Among the ones collected in proof condition, very few are Deep Cameos.

Besides the deep cameo, 1951 Roosevelt Dimes are common and can easily be found in your pocket change.

5. 1956 Roosevelt Dime Deep Cameo (Proof) PR69

1956 Roosevelt Dime Deep Cameo (Proof) PR69

  • Price: $19,975
  • Year: 1956
  • Mintage: 669,384
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $4063

The 1956 Roosevelt Dimes (Proof) are one of the most common types of ten cents. Anything less than PR68 can be easily found and can only fetch less than $10.

However, grades PR68+ can be pretty valuable, especially in cameo and deep cameo. Moreover, these dimes are the rarest to find in these grades and conditions.

The deep cameo shows a strikingly sharp definition with jet-black base fields of the dime.

6. 1950 Roosevelt Dime Deep Cameo (Proof) PR68

1950 Roosevelt Dime Deep Cameo (Proof) PR68

  • Price: $18,800
  • Year: 1950
  • Mintage: 51,386
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $3846

The 1950 Roosevelt Dimes, available in circulated condition, can be valued from $1.85 to $2.35. However, dimes available in uncirculated condition can fetch up to $315.

1950 was the first year in which Roosevelt Dimes were minted in proof condition. Therefore, finding a good grade for this dime is nearly impossible. You can easily find dimes in grades from PR60 to PR66. The ones in excellent condition with grade PR68+ are precious.

For instance, the deep cameo version, rated PR68, was auctioned in 2014 for a whopping price of $18,800.

7. 1999-D Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) MS65

1999-D Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) MS65

  • Price: $14,375
  • Year: 1999
  • Mintage: 1,397,750,000
  • Mint: Denver
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $0210

The 1999-D Roosevelt Dimes are easy to obtain as almost 1.4 billion were struck that year. Collectors can quickly get the coins in good conditions up to MS67.

However, dimes with grading MS68 are hard to find as these are highly scarce. Moreover, finding a full band in such a grade can be even more difficult.

The 1999-D Roosevelt Dimes can go up to $30 in value on the open market. However, in some cases, MS65 1999-D has gained tremendous value.

For instance, one of the dimes in perfect condition, graded at MS65, was auctioned for $14,375 in 2009.

8. 1949 Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) MS68FB

1949 Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) MS68FB

  • Price: $13,200
  • Year: 1949
  • Mintage: 30,940,000
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 90% Silver and 10% Copper
  • Melt Value: $3846

In the post-war era and during the times following the 1947’s economic recession, the 1949 Roosevelt Dimes were struck in relatively lesser quantity. However, according to NGC coin, there are a lot of samples for the dimes in mint condition, mostly MS67+.

In perfect and uncirculated condition, the dimes can be sold for as much as $1000.

You can observe a unique sample auctioned in 2018 to fetch value up to $13,200 with a grading of MS68. Surprisingly, only 68 of these dimes are in such condition and can be found with almost no impairment on the surface.

9. 1983 Roosevelt Dime No-S Deep Cameo (Proof) PR70

1983 Roosevelt Dime No-S Deep Cameo (Proof) PR70

  • Price: $10,560
  • Year: 1983
  • Mintage: 3,279,126
  • Mint: San Francisco
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $0210

Besides the other three most-rare “No-S” dime editions of 1968, 1970, and 1975, the 1983 Roosevelt Dime is the last one with such an error in proof condition. Mostly, you can find the coins in such a state with deep cameo surfaces.

According to PCGS, one case was auctioned for $10,560 with a PR70 grade in 2014. The 1983 No-S dimes with deep cameo surface and in proof condition are extremely hard to find.

So if you find the 1983 Roosevelt Dime in your proof set with a missing “S” mark, be sure to get it evaluated.

10. 1964 Roosevelt Dime (Special Strike) SP66

1964 Roosevelt Dime (Special Strike) SP66

  • Price: $10,200
  • Year: 1964
  • Mintage: 3,950,762
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 90% Silver and 10% Copper
  • Melt Value: $3846

With sharp details, satiny surface, and clean rim, the special strike 1964 dimes show a relatively more precise surface than other coins with special strikes in 1965, 1966, and 1967.

The special strike dimes, also known as Special Mint Sets (SMS), were struck for the first time in 1964, and only a couple dozen were minted. This was also the year when the U.S mint was about to convert its coinage from silver to clad-based composition.

The 1964 Roosevelt SMS Dimes are incredibly scarce. According to experts, only up to 50 sets of all grades of these special dimes have been found and verified.

A case was auctioned for $10,200 in 2019 with special grading of SP66.

11. 1956 Roosevelt Dime FB (Regular Strike) MS68

1956 Roosevelt Dime FB (Regular Strike) MS68

  • Price: $9,988
  • Year: 1956
  • Mintage: 108,640,000
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 90% Silver and 10% Copper
  • Melt Value: $3846

Although many 1956 Roosevelt Dimes minted at Philadelphia mint have less sharp features owing to quality control at that time, some dimes are available in an uncirculated condition which can be sold for $500+ quickly on the open market. However, in circulated conditions, it can be valued between $1.85 and $2.35.

With 100+ million mintage, the 1956 dime is easy to come by. Mainly, dimes up to MS67 condition can be obtained with little effort.

However, the dimes with full band characteristics become rare as the grades go up. For instance, MS67 1956 dimes with full band characteristics are scarce to find. Only a couple of such dimes are known to exist.

The coin’s obverse side can be observed with a rainbow color tint (a fine mixture of violet, green, blue, and gold), while the reverse side shows a shade of blue around the edges.

One case was auctioned for $9,988 in 2013 with full band characteristics, graded at MS68FB.

12. 1954 Roosevelt Dime Deep Cameo (Proof) PR68

1954 Roosevelt Dime Deep Cameo (Proof) PR68

  • Price: $9,400
  • Year: 1954
  • Mintage: 233,300
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 90% Silver and 10% Copper
  • Melt Value: $3846

The 1954 Dime in circulated condition can be valued between $1.85 and $2.35, and one in uncirculated condition can go up to $1500.

Mostly, coins experienced blurred surfaces as the Philadelphia mint faced quality-control issues during the 1950s. Also, the dimes saw the highest mintage figures for the Philadelphia mint. Some samples can be found with the uncirculated condition.

However, 1954 dimes with deep cameo surface in the proof condition are the rarest among all the dimes struck that year.

A similar case was auctioned in 2014 for $9,400 with a grade of PR68. According to experts, only a dozen examples of such a kind have been known until now.

Nevertheless, proof dimes of 1954 graded at PR68 can be easily found, while the ones with a higher grade are almost non-existent, according to PCGS. Another case without a deep cameo but with an MS67 grading can be observed with full band characteristics here.

13. 1955 Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) MS68

1955 Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) MS68

  • Price: $9,300
  • Year: 1955
  • Mintage: 12,450,181
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 90% Silver and 10% Copper
  • Melt Value: $3846

According to PCGS, this series of Roosevelt Dimes was the only one with such low mintage figures to be minted for circulation. However, there are other cases where mintage has been extremely low, but the dimes were not issued for circulation.

The ones with grades MS64 to MS66 can be easily obtained in good condition and are worth anywhere between $1.85 and $2.35. Moreover, a 1954 dime in an uncirculated condition is worth $1400+ on the open market.

However, with MS67+, these dimes are incredibly scarce. And the ones with full band characteristics become more challenging to acquire.

An MS67 1955-P Roosevelt Dime with full band characteristics on the reverse side is very hard to obtain, with only a dozen cases identified yet.

One such case can be seen in 2020, where it was auctioned for $9,300 with MS68 ratings without full band characteristics.

Moreover, some errors can also be observed for the 1955 Roosevelt dimes here.

14. 1998-P Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) NG0 – Group of Bonded Coins

1998-P Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) NG0 – Group of Bonded Coins

  • Price: $9,200
  • Year: 1998
  • Mintage: 1,163,000,000
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $0210

The 1998-P 10 cents coin is worth between $0.15 and $0.35, while the ones in perfect and uncirculated condition can only be valued up to $60.

It is one of the most common series of Roosevelt Dimes, as over 1 billion were struck that year. Therefore, samples with grades up to MS67 are very common. However, the dimes become rare as the grade goes higher than MS68.

One example was auctioned in 2011 at $9,200 with grade NG0 ratings. The case in question is related to the bonded coins group left by an error. According to PCGS, the group consists of 32 dimes pressed together into a single distorted one.

Mostly, such errors occur due to a lack of quality controls. However, the error has made the series of coin worth more than its original value.

15. 1965 Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) AU55

1965 Roosevelt Dime (Regular Strike) AU55

  • Price: $8,625
  • Year: 1965
  • Mintage: 1,652,140,570
  • Mint: Philadelphia
  • Metal: 75% Copper and 25% Nickel
  • Melt Value: $0210

Roosevelt Dimes struck in Philadelphia in 1965 are worth between $0.15 and $0.35 and can go up to $400 if available in uncirculated, pristine condition.

This was the first year the U.S mint removed silver compositions and started using clad compositions for coins. Therefore, this was the first series of clad-based Roosevelt dimes.

Although one can easily find the 1965 dimes with MS66 grade, it becomes hard to find pristine condition dimes for grades MS67 and above.

For instance, one dime was auctioned in 2006 for $8,625 with a grade of AU55.

Buying Guide for Beginners

Among millions of mintage figures, it is almost impossible to find a Roosevelt dime that can be worth more than $10,000.

However, with the proper knowledge, you can find a great deal about knowing your dime’s worth.

For instance, specific Roosevelt Dime errors and varieties can make your dime worth over $100, while some rare errors can easily fetch up to $1,000.

Another example can be the Roosevelt Dimes with missing mint marks, such as the ones in 1975, 1968, and 1983. Other valuable dimes can have errors, such as doubled dies, repunched mintmark, and a doubled mintmark.

Moreover, Deep Cameo surface coins can fetch a handsome amount of money. Deep cameo surfaces have a well-frosted finish between the raised side of the coin on the obverse side and the coin’s background.

Another category of Roosevelt Dimes can be considered quite valuable – the dimes with full band characteristics. The term “full-band” represents how clearly the horizontal twin bands can be seen on the reverse side of the coin on the torch’s upper and lower ends.

FAQs

Which is the most expensive Roosevelt Dime?

1975 Roosevelt Dime in proof condition with a missing mint mark “S” is considered the most expensive Roosevelt Dimes of all time.

The dime was auctioned in 2019 for $450,000 and can easily fetch more than half a million dollars in price.

Almost all the Roosevelt Dimes facing “No-S” errors are most valuable in proof conditions. Only four years have seen these errors during the entire timeline of Roosevelt dimes, and each one has proved valuable among specialists and coin collectors.

How much silver is in Roosevelt Dime?

The Roosevelt Dime endured two separate compositions during its lifetime. The first era lasted from 1946 to 1964. The Roosevelt Dimes during that time consisted of 90% Silver and 10% copper.

The coin’s weight was approximately 2.5 grams (0.08038 troy ounces), while the silver composition amounted to 2.25 grams (0.07234 troy ounces).

Which is the rarest Roosevelt Dime?

1968 Roosevelt Dime with missing mint mark “S” is the rarest dime of all the Roosevelt ten-cent coins. It is considered most rare as the mintage figure was low.

Out of all the “No-S” Roosevelt Dimes in the proof condition, it is rare and is worth up to $50,000.

For instance, a 1968 Roosevelt Dime with grade PR68 was auctioned in 2006 for $48,875, according to PCGS.

What are years of Roosevelt Dimes worth more money?

Roosevelt Dimes, missing the S-mint mark in 1975, 1968, 1983, and 1970, is considered the most valuable.

Other years for Roosevelt Dimes include most of the years from the 1950s, including 1950, 1951, 1954, 1955, and 1956.

Besides the 1950s, other years, such as 1968, 1999, 1949, 1998, 1965, and 1972 are also quite popular among coin collectors and specialists.

Conclusion

Roosevelt coins can be highly valuable if found in specific conditions of a particular year of striking. Therefore, you must be aware of anything that can turn your pocket change into a fortune.

Luckily we have offered a detailed roundup of the most valuable Roosevelt Dimes out there right now. Some are worth more than $10,000, while some are even more than half a million dollars.

If you already own a Roosevelt Dime and are looking to get it evaluated, don’t waste another minute. Who knows, you might get lucky.

It is time to give Roosevelt Dime the appreciation it needs.

Also Read: The Comprehensive Dimes Worth Money List (1894-S 10C Branch Mint PR66 Sold on Jan 7, 2016 For $1,997,500)

Sharing is caring!

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.