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As you are all aware there are so many kinds of quarter coins available, finding those that will stand out from the rest can be gruesome. Luckily, some good people were fortunate enough to come across rare specimens and errors and share them with the rest of us, so we know when and where we need to pay attention.

When you are a coin enthusiast you get quite excited when you stumble upon a rare error coin or potential error on the coin. However, you can never be sure if the error is real or fake and if it makes your coin valuable and unique or not.

There are a few more details you need to pay attention to when determining the real value of your error coin and I will mention them in the upcoming paragraphs. So if you are interested in finding out more about quarter errors worth money keep on reading.

Determining The Quarters Value

As I already said there are a few things you need to take into consideration when trying to figure out how valuable your error quarter might be. Yes, errors significantly increase the value of the coin but when they are paired with features like

  • Special series
  • Special date and mintmark
  • Scarce quarter varieties
  • Grading condition

Make sure you know all special series

Some quarter series are more valuable than others because of the minting date, special design, material combination that is used in the minting process, etc. Here are some of the most valuable quarters series that are rich with minting errors. These will bring you a lot of money.

Dates and mintmarks

You should keep in mind that early quarters, minted between 1796 and 1840 are much more valuable than those minted after this period. Also, coins minted in this period originate from the Philadelphia mint, which was the only mint at the time. This is what makes them scarce, also, the mintage numbers were low, from two to three hundred thousand per year so a coin from this period is a real gem, especially the one with the error!

Branch mints were created after 1840. Other branch mints became important to the quarter series, New Orleans, San Francisco, Carson City, and Denver. Mintmarks are a very important detail to pay attention to since branch mints struck lower numbers of quarters over the year,  creating scarce varieties.

Why I’m saying this? Well, because a lot of people forget to pay attention to these details when they come across the error and forget to count these details into the final price. Meaning they end up selling their valuable error quarters for lower prices!

Grading condition

An error quarter is a coin that was incorrectly manufactured by a mint. Even though they don’t come in their best condition and they can feature different shapes, sizes, and types of errors, they still need to be recognizable. Coins can be in

  • Mint state – Only coins with no wear to any surface can be classified as mint-grade coins. Every series of quarters have specific guides and points they need to score according to their original design and first signs of wear. For instance, the first signs of wear are smoothed and flattened high spots.
  • Extremely fine state – These quarters retain all major design elements and strong and sharp relief. However, some signs of wear are noted. Just small amounts of flatness are acceptable when grading coins with an extremely fine grade.
  • Fine state – For these coins signs of wear and tear are easily visible on a surface. However, these are only moderate wear that has smoothed all high areas, but these flattened areas do not connect!
  • Good state – These quarters feature heavy wear that has smoothed the majority of the designs you can’t notice any fine detail. For instance, on portrays, the inner lines of hair, headbands, and indications of a gown are faded to smooth.

Different Types Of Quarter Errors You Need To Pay Attention To

When you are determined to search and collect coins with errors the first thing you need to learn is how many different types of errors are there. To someone who is inexperienced and does not have a sharp eye for details, any scratch can seem like a valuable error, but unfortunately, that ain’t true.

  • Die cap – This happens when a coin sticks to the hammer die and when it remains on the die long enough it spreads around the outside of the die, and forms a cap that looks like a bottle cap.
  • Wrong planchet – This error occurs when a die of a certain type or denomination coin ends up striking a planchet that is not intended for it. To be more precise when we talk about quarter errors it is very common to see that a half dollar is struck on a quarter planchet and vice versa. This error is easy to identify by weight and by size.
  • Off-center – This error is when the coin is struck slightly to one side or another. In some cases, the design can be partially printed since it is above 50% off the center.
  • Broadstrike – You will recognize this error with ease. When a coin is struck without the collar that forms the rim and edge and it has a strange shape that is a broadstrike error coin.
  • Partial collars – This is a very rare and uncommon error. It will occur only when there is some kind of malfunction of the striking press. In this case, the collar is in an incorrect position. The lower die will form a rim, and after a coin is struck the lower die will move the coin upwards and eject it. After this happens an edge will have a partial reeding and a partial blank surface.
  • Uniface strikes – This error will occur when a blank planchet is mistakenly placed on top of another blank planchet. In the coining process, they are struck together with the hammer and die. However, the bottom planchet will receive only the reverse design, while the planchet on top will receive only the obverse design.
  • Brockage – This will occur when an already minted coin sticks to the die and impresses onto the next blank planchet that has not been struck. That new blank which is fed between the struck coin and the hammer die will receive a mirror image of the same design.
  • Double and triple struck – If there is a malfunction in the pressing machine an already struck coin won’t be ejected and it may receive a second or third strike by the dies. This is a very common minting error.
  • Indents – This is a rare error that occurs when two blanks are fed into the same collar. In this case, one blank will partly overlay on top of the other and when the hammer dies strikes it will create a depression that is shaped similarly to the upper blank.
  • Die adjustment – When a coin is struck from the press with very little pressure due to adjustment an extremely weak strike occurs that is hardly visible.
  • Bonded coins – These errors occur when the feeder system of the coin press is jammed. In this case, a struck coin is not properly ejected and another blank is fed into the same collar and struck. The blank coin will land on top of the unejected coin and when struck they will bond together.
  • Double denominations – This error occurs when a coin is struck on a previously struck coin of a smaller type and denomination. Coins with this error are very valuable and sought-after!
  • Mated pairs – As the name says this error involves two different coins that were struck together at the same time. These coins can be overlapped, or one can be off-center positioned on top of another coin.
  • Proof errors – These are the rarest errors that occur since the proof coins are struck by technicians who load blanks into special presses manually.
  • Transitional errors – This error occurs when a coin is struck on a planchet from a previous year on a planchet with a different metal composition.
  • Fold-over strikes – This error is extremely rare since it occurs only when the blank is standing vertically between the dies. The force of te strike is so great that it bends and folds the blank.
  • Missing edge lettering – This error occurs when the edge-lettering, inscriptions, mint mark, and year are absent form the coin.

Comprehensive List Of Quarter Errors Worth Money

What you need to understand is that the prices fluctuate due to the date, grade, eye appeal and how rare and dramatic the striking error is. In some cases the price is based on the rarity and grade of the particular coin, an sometimes the price is dictated by how rare the error is.

I will always mention that when purchasing a coin with a mint error, it is important to use multiple resources to determine value. Remember, there are so many mint errors that they can’t fit into one category, so make sure you include all the features.

Name and year Mintage and varieties Metal composition Diameter and weight Price
1828 Capped Bust Quarter 25C 25/5/50C Error Reverse MS67 102,000 89.24% Silver

10.76% Copper

27.5 mm

6.74 grams

$352,500
1828 Capped Bust 25C 25 Strike Over 50C, B-3, R.5, MS67 102,000 89.24% Silver

10.76% Copper

27.5 mm

6.74 grams

$282,000
2000P 25C Sacagaweaa Dollar on obverse / Statehood Quarter reverse side

Mule MS65+

767,140,000 77% Copper

12% Zinc

7% Manganese

4% Nickel

26.5 mm

8.10 grams

$144,000
2000P $1 Sacagaweaa Dollar/Washington Statehood Quarter Mule MS67 767,140,000 77% Copper

12% Zinc

7% Manganese

4% Nickel

26.5 mm

8.10 grams

$120,000
1905 1C Indian Cent Struck on a Quarter Eagle Planchet MS64 80,717,011 95% Copper

5% Tin and Zinc

19 mm

3.11 grams

$105,750
2000P Sacagawea Dollar — Muled With Statehood Washington Quarter Obverse — MS66 767,140,000 77% Copper

12% Zinc

7% Manganese

4% Nickel

26.5 mm

8.10 grams

$88,125
1925-D Indian Gold Quarter Eagle Double Struck in Collar– AU58 578,000 90% Gold

10% Copper

18 mm

4.18 grams

$66,125
1918/7S 25C Standing Liberty Quarter Overdate Minting Error 52,000 90% SIlver

10% Copper

24.3 mm

6.30 grams

$48,875
1825 Quarter Eagle $2 1/2 Double Struck Cleaned

40% off center

63,000 Copper 23.5 mm

5.40 grams

$45,600
Undated 25C Washington Quarter–Double Struck With Two Reverse Dies and Indent–MS66 5,404,000 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$41,975
Type Two 25C Standing Liberty Quarter — Struck 35% Off Center — MS65 N/A 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

5.67 grams

$33,600
1891 25C Seated Liberty Quarter — Double Struck, Second Strike Off Center — MS62 3,920,600 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$31,200
1943 1C Lincoln Cent — Struck on a Curacao 25 Cents Planchet — MS61 684,628,670 Zinc-coated steel 19 mm

2.70 grams

$31,200
1965 Martha Washington Pattern Half Dollar Struck on a Quarter Planchet in Error N/A 75% Copper

25% Nickel over a pure Copper center

24.30 mm

5.67 grams

$29,900
1976 $1 Type One Bicentennial Dollar — Overstruck on a 1976 Bicentennial Quarter — MS64 4,019,000 75% Copper

25% Nickel over a pure Copper center

38.5 mm

22.70 grams

$28,200
1941 50C Walking Liberty Half — Struck on Quarter Planchet with Edge Brockage — AU58 NGC N/A 90% SIlver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$24,675
1965 25C Washington Quarter — Transitional Date Struck on Silver Planchet — MS62 2,300,000 75% Copper

25% Nickel over a pure Copper center

24.30 mm

5.67 grams

$16,800
1920 25C Standing Liberty Quarter–Struck on a Peru 20 Centavo Planchet–MS60 27,860,000 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$16,100
1983P 25C Washington Quarter — Overstruck on an Amusement Token — MS65 673,535,000 75% Copper 25% Nickel over a pure Copper center 24.30 mm

5.67 grams

$15,862
1919 Standing Liberty MS Quarter–Struck 50% Off Center–XF45 PCGS 11,324,000 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$15,525
1898 Barber Quarter 25C — Obverse Die Cap and Brockage — MS62 11,100,000 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$15,275
1976S 25C Bicentennial Quarter Overstruck on a 1967 Dime, Double Denomination PR67 809,784,016 75% Copper

25% Nickel over a pure Copper center

24.30 mm

5.67 grams

$15,000
1855 Liberty Quarter Eagle–Struck Off-Center at 5 O’clock– MS63 3,677 90% Gold

10% Copper

18 mm

4.18 grams

$13,800
1999-P 25C New Jersey Statehood Quarter — Struck on Foreign Planchet — MS65 363,200,000 75% Copper 25% Nickel 24.30 mm

5.67 grams

$13,200
1918/7-S 25C –Artificial Toning — NGC Details. Unc. FS-101

Hubbing Error

11,072,000 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$12,925
1958 25C Washington Quarter — Full First Strike Brockage of Obverse on Reverse — PR62 6,360,000 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$12,337
1923-S Quarter–Struck 25% Off Center–AU58 1,360,000 90% Silver

10% Copper

24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$10,925
1999-P 25C Pennsylvania Statehood Quarter–Experimental Planchet–MS67 N/A Experimental combination of metal was used – copper and zinc, with traces of manganese and nickel. 24.30 mm

6.30 grams

$9,775

Closing Words

It seems like quarter errors are by far the most common and valued one among collectors. However, they are pretty hard to find, but don’t let the odds go against you. There are billions of quarters minted, no matter the era and series, so there’s always a chance that one of these valuable error quarter will find its way to you.

The only thing you need to do is to keep a sharp eye out, and don’t give up on your search. Yes, you won’t find early quarters in your spare change, but some Washington quarters that are still in circulation can fetch you a lot of money if they have some unique error in design.

So the morla of the story is check your pocket change religiously, because if you never look, you’ll never know! If you have some interesting error coin to share with us please let us know, we will love to hear more about it. As always, good luck with your coin collecting adventures and happy hunting!

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